Conservation Events

December 1, 2017Open House for Restoration Plans at Scattercreek Wildlife Area

 

 

 

What:   Open House on restoration plans and public input following the Scattercreek fire

Host:    Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)

When:  Wednesday, Dec. 13, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Where: Swede Hall, 18543 Albany St. SW, Rochester

The wildfire began Aug. 22 in a residential area near Rochester and scorched 345 acres of Scatter Creek. The fire destroyed several houses in the neighborhood and prompted the temporary evacuation of nearly 100 other residences. In the wildlife area, a historic homestead built in 1860 and a barn were also destroyed.

Owned and managed by WDFW, the Scatter Creek Wildlife Area provides a sanctuary for several threatened and endangered wildlife species, including the Mazama pocket gopher and Taylor’s checkerspot and mardon skipper butterflies. It is also a popular destination for hiking, bird watching, dog training, and upland bird hunting in the south Puget Sound area.  It has been a frequent location for field trips sponsored by Black Hills Audubon.

You are invited to come and learn more about how WDFW plans to restore the native prairie land that was burned by the wildfire, and to have an opportunity to provide input about this valuable land.

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April 22, 2017March for Science Olympia

What:     March for Science Olympia

When:     Earth Day, April 22 at 11 a.m.

Where:     Washington State Capitol steps

Options:     Heritage Park at Noon for Education Tables and Rally

 

Bring the kids, bring signs, and show where you stand on science! Our voices must be strong!

The March for Science Olympia is on Earth Day, April 22, 2017. We are having this March and Rally along with the one in Washington, D.C., and more than 400 national and international cities. In Olympia, our community will show their support for science and scientific research as we march from the Capitol steps to Heritage Park for a rally where we will hear speakers and learn from education booths. We want everyone to be able to attend. You can skip the March and join us at Heritage Park for our speakers and rally

 

“The March for Science is about supporting the public’s understanding of the scientific consensus and safeguarding the scientific community.” says Marco Rossaire Rossi, an organizer in Olympia. “The march will bring together members of our diverse communities who openly support the relationship between science and democracy.”

 

March for Science Olympia is a celebration of the importance of science in improving our...

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March 23, 2017E-bird class

Stream Team has arranged for an E-bird class to be taught by Bill Tweit, a long-time WDFW. biologist who is well known as an expert birder. E-bird is an ideal repository for the collected data.  If you are interested, please contact me by email at RWADSRK@nullGmail.com.

 

(from Mar/April 2017 Echo newsletter, by Bob Wadsworth)

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June 9, 2016Annual Black Hills Audubon Society Picnic

The picnic starts at 5 p.m., at LBA Park Shelter. It will focus on all we did For The Birds!  Come celebrate our successes; share the things you did, and hear a compilation of our chapter’s accomplishments.  Together we do make a positive difference–enhancing lands for wildlife, conserving resources, eliminating toxic chemical use, and restoring habitat for birds.  This year we will provide the meal.  If you wish to bring something to share, please do.  A pre-dinner bird walk will be held at 5 p.m.  Dinner begins about 5:30 p.m.

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March 25, 2015Climate Change and Birds

If you are interested in mitigating climate change … SAVE THE DATE!

 

Must RSVP by 12-midnight
Mon., March 23 to Kim Adelson.

On Wednesday, MARCH 25th, BHAS will be holding a forum at which participants will help both to shape BHAS’ agenda in regards to climate change and to discover steps that they as individuals can take to help reduce its impact.

As you may know, in the Fall of 2014 the National Audubon Society came out with results of a major study which found that within the next 50 years more than half of the 588 species they studied will be greatly, negatively affected by global warming; included in this list are 189 species that live in the state of Washington. (The report is available on their Web page. A link can be found on National Audubon’s website:
http://climate.audubon.org/article/audubon-report-glance).

National Audubon proposes a five-pronged approach to addressing this crisis:

Create bird friendly yards;
Help local Important Bird Areas (IBAs);
Put birds on the community agenda
Meet with decision makers; and
Support policies that lower greenhouse emissions.BHAS members have, of course, been very active in each of these areas for a long time. Come learn about what we are...

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