Conservation Events

April 4, 2017Attention: Now is Your Chance to Become a Habitat Steward™!

National Wildlife Federation and Veteran Conservation Corps are offering a specialized 24-hour training to teach you how help others to create and restore wildlife habitat in backyards, schoolyards, and other private and public areas. This program is engaging, fun and highly informative and you get to meet and interact with local conservation professionals and other similarly interested folks! Expert speakers will present on topics such as: rain gardens, gardening for wildlife, native plants, invasive species removal, habitat restoration, pollinators, Pacific Northwest ecology, and much more! Benefits include: an NWF volunteer t-shirt, 24 hours of hands-on training, engaging field trips, a comprehensive training manual with local resources, instruction from local professionals, and continued support from NWF and VCC staff.
WHEN: Four 3-hour classroom sessions every Tuesday in April from 6:00-9:00pm. Two Saturday field trips (8th, 29th), plan on a full day!
WHERE: Lacey Veterans Services Hub (4232 6th Ave. SE, Ste. 202, Lacey, WA).
COST: $30, includes classroom materials; scholarships are available!
RSVP: Register here by April 3rd. Questions or concerns? Contact Sarah at WAHabitatCoordinator@nullnwf.org or (206) 577-7809.

*Prospective Habitat Stewards must commit to providing 30-hours of volunteer service on local conservation projects within a year after the training.

 

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March 23, 2017E-bird class

Stream Team has arranged for an E-bird class to be taught by Bill Tweit, a long-time WDFW. biologist who is well known as an expert birder. E-bird is an ideal repository for the collected data.  If you are interested, please contact me by email at RWADSRK@nullGmail.com.

 

(from Mar/April 2017 Echo newsletter, by Bob Wadsworth)

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January 12, 2017Help Protect the Marbled Murrelet in Washington State

This endangered seabird feeds in the ocean and flies up to 55 miles inland to nest in old growth forest. The Washington state population of this unique bird has shrunk by 44% over the last 15 years, leaving only about 7,500 birds remaining.  Now your input is needed to protect the Marbled Murrelet.

The Department of the Natural Resources (DNR) and the Long-Term Conservation Strategy

Statewide, the DNR manages approximately two million acres of land and  29-47% of DNR’s forests that are within 55 miles of salt water  are critical to Marbled Murrelets. These state-owned forests are either classified as habitat occupied by nesting Marbled, are buffers around that habitat, or are biologically-important potential recovery habitat.

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June 9, 2016Annual Black Hills Audubon Society Picnic

The picnic starts at 5 p.m., at LBA Park Shelter. It will focus on all we did For The Birds!  Come celebrate our successes; share the things you did, and hear a compilation of our chapter’s accomplishments.  Together we do make a positive difference–enhancing lands for wildlife, conserving resources, eliminating toxic chemical use, and restoring habitat for birds.  This year we will provide the meal.  If you wish to bring something to share, please do.  A pre-dinner bird walk will be held at 5 p.m.  Dinner begins about 5:30 p.m.

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March 25, 2015Climate Change and Birds

If you are interested in mitigating climate change … SAVE THE DATE!

 

Must RSVP by 12-midnight
Mon., March 23 to Kim Adelson.

On Wednesday, MARCH 25th, BHAS will be holding a forum at which participants will help both to shape BHAS’ agenda in regards to climate change and to discover steps that they as individuals can take to help reduce its impact.

As you may know, in the Fall of 2014 the National Audubon Society came out with results of a major study which found that within the next 50 years more than half of the 588 species they studied will be greatly, negatively affected by global warming; included in this list are 189 species that live in the state of Washington. (The report is available on their Web page. A link can be found on National Audubon’s website:
http://climate.audubon.org/article/audubon-report-glance).

National Audubon proposes a five-pronged approach to addressing this crisis:

Create bird friendly yards;
Help local Important Bird Areas (IBAs);
Put birds on the community agenda
Meet with decision makers; and
Support policies that lower greenhouse emissions.BHAS members have, of course, been very active in each of these areas for a long time. Come learn about what we are...

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